The life of frederick douglass analysis

Frederick Douglass then gives the reader a brutal short summary of that the rape of female slaves by their white masters actually benefits slavery because by law the products of the rape become slaves themselves.

As Douglass becomes a young man, he starts fighting to actually be free. Douglass vows never to be whipped again. Douglass becomes a Sunday school teacher to other slaves, a position he enjoys. Frederick Douglass summarizes the details of an instance in which a slave was heading down a road and encountered his master without knowing who he was.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

In the first chapter, Douglass also makes mention of the hypocrisy of Christian slave owners who used religious teachings to justify their abhorrent treatment of slaves; the religious practice of slave owners is a recurrent theme in the text.

The reader is left to figure out the psychology behind such an awful act while Douglass explains that he was afraid of the idea of being whipped that he often hid. Getting back to his own experiences, Douglass talks about being too young to work in fields and thereby developing a relationship with the young white boy Daniel.

Her brother scolds her and tells her that teaching a slave and allowing him to learn will only make him unhappy later, a fact which Douglass begins to agree with later as his level of education increases. Thomas and Rowena are archetypes of the hypocritical Christian slaveholder.

Active Themes In August ofThomas Auld goes to a Methodist camp-meeting and returns with strong religious faith. LitChart as a printable PDF. And he never is. A new overseer named Mr. Douglass starts to suspect that if slaves managed to educate themselves, it would be impossible to stop them from becoming free.

Douglass soon makes an arrangement with Auld to hire himself out and give Auld a set amount of wages each week. Douglass lives for a time with William Freeland, a kind master, and Douglass finds a family among the other slaves there.

Lloyd enacted certain measures to keep his slaves in line, including whipping slaves who stole fruit from his prize garden and beating slaves for apparently no reason.

Summary Analysis At this point, Douglass can now give accurate dates when describing his experience. Keeping in mind that this narrative was meant for Northern white readers, it is important to consider what function these side stories serve.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave

Douglass also draws attention to the false system of values created by slavery, in which allegiance to the slave master is far stronger than an allegiance to other slaves. Douglass hopes that this faith might make Thomas emancipate his slaves, or at least treat them more humanely, but Thomas instead becomes a crueler man.

He gives a short summary of the way the drunken cruel Mr. He is being taken to Baltimore which to him sounds like heaven compared to the plantation. Slaves are violently forbidden to learn to study the Bible solely because literacy threatens to empower them.

Active Themes Thomas Auld is particularly mean and immoral because he gained his slaves by marriage. Thomas tries to discipline Douglass, but his whippings fail. The second stage of his life begins when the seven-year-old Douglass is sent to work for a new set of masters in Baltimore.

Here and throughout the autobiography, Douglass highlights the common practice of white slave owners raping slave women, both to satisfy their sexual hungers and to expand their slave populations. He wistfully remembers the songs they used to sing that once sounded happy but now he realizes were very mournful and belied great pain and suffering.

This forms the beginning of his life in the public eye, speaking and writing in favor of the abolition of slavery. He not only becomes an abolitionist activist himself; he writes the narrative of his life to teach others, white and black, how to follow in his footsteps.

For a while it works, and Douglass is reduced to the state of mind of an animal. Thomas does not adequately feed his slaves.Analysis and Summary of “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass” Posted by Nicole Smith, Dec 6, Non-Fiction Comments Closed Print Although throughout the Narrative, Frederick Douglass has a tendency to skip around often and does not always follow a completely chronological ordering, the work begins with his childhood.

Need help with Chapter 9 in Frederick Douglass's The Narrative of Frederick Douglass? Check out our revolutionary side-by-side summary and analysis. The Narrative of Frederick Douglass Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes.

Throughout his life, Douglass continued to revise and expand his autobiography, publishing a second version in as My Bondage and My Freedom. The third version of Douglass' autobiography was published in as Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, and an expanded version of Life and Times was published in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by: Frederick Douglass Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass that was is a memoir by Frederick Douglass that was first published in.

Douglass lives for a time with William Freeland, a kind master, and Douglass finds a family among the other slaves there. Douglass becomes a Sunday school teacher to other slaves, a position he enjoys. Douglass's Narrative is like a highway map, showing us the road from slavery to freedom. At the beginning of the book, Douglass is a slave in both body and mind.

At the beginning of the book, Douglass is a slave in both body and mind.

Analysis and Summary of “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass” Download
The life of frederick douglass analysis
Rated 4/5 based on 4 review